Continuing on with my series of articles on the claims of so-called ‘Holocaust Survivors’, today we can look at the narrative of the famous ‘Holocaust Survivor’ David Dario Gabbai who died recently and has been subject to many hagiographic accounts of his life.

One such is provided by ‘Liberty Voice’ which writes that:

‘David Dario Gabbai was born on Sept. 2, 1922, in Thessaloniki, a city in Greece that had a community of 50,000 Sephardic Jews. The Jewish population was so essential in Thessaloniki that the port was closed on the Sabbath.
His parents, Victor and Rosa Beraha Gabbai had four children. Dario was sent to an Italian-themed school for clarinet lessons. Victor was from Italy and worked as a newspaper typographer.
In the spring of 1941, Germany invaded Greece. In February 1943, the Germans confined the Jewish people to two ghettos. Shortly after, the Germans began to transport people to Auschwitz. The Gabbai family was one of the last to be taken by the Germans. In April 1944, they began their 11-day journey crammed into cattle cars with little food and no toilet.
Once the Gabbai family arrive at Auschwitz, Dario saw his father, mother, and youngest brother sent to the gas chambers. Dario was 21 and muscular, therefore, he was selected along with his older brother, Jakob, as Sonderkommandos at Birkenau nearby.
Next, Gabbai was disposing of the corpses of Hungarian Jews who had recently arrived at the concentration camp. Each day, over 6,000 Jewish people were killed, according to Berenbaum, a professor of Jewish studies at American Jewish University in Los Angeles.
After Gabbai locked the door to the gas chamber, Gabbai could hear the women and children screaming, crying, and scratching the walls in “desperate efforts to breathe.”
Once the doors were opened, Gabbai and the other Sonderkommandos had to climb over bodies pile five and six feet high. Then they would harvest glasses, gold teeth, and prosthetic limbs before hauling out the dead bodies and scrubbing the floors and walls covered with excrement and blood.
Additionally, Gabbai recalled being handed scissors because he was ordered to cut the hair off the women, to make blankets and socks for German soldiers. Gabbai said he heard a sound emerge from a corpse. “He was so sickened that he said to himself, ‘Where is God?’”
“I saw people I just saw alive, the mother with the kids in their arms, some black and blue from the gas, dead. I said to myself – my mind went blind, how can I survive in this environment?”
Gabbai and the other Sonderkommandos would drag the dead bodies to an elevator that would lift them to the furnace floor. There was a dissecting room, where jewelry and other valuables would be removed. To survive, Gabbai “shut down” and functioned on automatic pilot.
Germans preferred less common nationalities like Greek and Ladino-speaking Jews for these tasks. They could not easily communicate the precise details of the “factorylike” slaughter to the Polish, Hungarian, and other European inmates.
Berenbaum said, “They had seen too much and known too much.”
There were benefits to being a Sonderkommandos: They could scavenge for food left behind in the undressing rooms and during the bitter, cold winters, they could sleep near the warmth of the crematories.
As allied forces neared Poland, Nazis destroyed the gas chambers in hopes of obliterating evidence of mass murder. Then, at gunpoint, they herded frail inmates by the thousands on a death march along roads covered in deep snow. The Nazis marched the frail and weak to trains that would take them to other concentration camps in Germany and Austria. Hundreds of Jewish people died along the way.
According to Gabbai, he survived the march by daydreaming of warm days in Greece. He distracted himself so forcefully that he actually began to sweat in the freezing cold. He ended up in a subcamp of the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria. When the concentration camp was liberated by the U.S. Army on May 6, 1945, Gabbai weighed less than 100 pounds.’ (1)

Now there are two aspects of Gabbai’s story that are… shall we say… odd.

Firstly the idea that you can survive in a closed box car – the type the Germans used to transport jews to the concentration camp – for eleven days with ‘little food’ and presumably also little water and no space to sit/lay down let alone sleep in the late southern European spring seems rather miraculous to say the least, especially as Gabbai mentions no casualties having occurred in said box car.

This either suggests that Gabbai forgot to mention casualties – which seems rather odd – or there simply weren’t many to talk about because the Germans did indeed provide food and water to the jews and what Gabbai is really saying is that the Germans didn’t provide enough food and water to the jews in his opinion. This simpler explanation isn’t as satisfying for the jewish atrocity narrative but it does have the virtue of making a lot more sense than miraculous 11 day journeys with little to no food and water but with no casualties either.

Secondly the idea that the Germans would have been able to gas ‘6,000 jews’ a day when:

‘Once the doors were opened, Gabbai and the other Sonderkommandos had to climb over bodies pile five and six feet high. Then they would harvest glasses, gold teeth, and prosthetic limbs before hauling out the dead bodies and scrubbing the floors and walls covered with excrement and blood.
Additionally, Gabbai recalled being handed scissors because he was ordered to cut the hair off the women, to make blankets and socks for German soldiers. Gabbai said he heard a sound emerge from a corpse. “He was so sickened that he said to himself, ‘Where is God?’”
“I saw people I just saw alive, the mother with the kids in their arms, some black and blue from the gas, dead. I said to myself – my mind went blind, how can I survive in this environment?”
Gabbai and the other Sonderkommandos would drag the dead bodies to an elevator that would lift them to the furnace floor. There was a dissecting room, where jewelry and other valuables would be removed.’ (2)

It is patently ludicrous to be quite frank, given that what Gabbai is claiming is that the Germans were gassing ‘6,000 jews’ a day while also having to climb over bodies piled ‘five to six feet high’ ‘harvesting glasses, gold teeth and prosthetic limbs’ as well as ‘cutting the hair off women’ before ‘hauling out the dead bodies and scrubbing the floors and walls’ so that they could go to the ‘dissecting room’ before they were cremated.

I mean you’d barely have time to do all that with that many jews in a week let alone in one day in a confined environment like a gas chamber!

In other words; Gabbai is claiming that the physically impossible is possible because he ‘was there’.

Do you believe him?

References

(1) https://guardianlv.com/2020/04/dario-gabbai-auschwitz-survivor-and-witness-dies-at-97/ alternatively see https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/11/world/europe/dario-gabbai-dead.html
(2) https://guardianlv.com/2020/04/dario-gabbai-auschwitz-survivor-and-witness-dies-at-97/