July 13, 2019

The Anti-Semitic Origins of the Tour de France

Karl Radl shares the forgotten origin of the world's premier cycling contest.

The Anti-Semitic Origins of the Tour de France

By Karl Radl

The Tour de France is the original and most prestigious of all long  distance bike races in the world. You may know that the Tour de France  was first run in 1903 by the French sports newspaper ‘L’Auto-Vélo’.

What you probably don’t know is that the magazine ‘L’Auto-Vélo’ was  created in 1899 as an opposition publication to the first and then only  sports newspaper, ‘Le Vélo’, because of the latter’s support for Dreyfus  during the Dreyfus Affair. Captain Alfred Dreyfus – a jew - was  accused of selling military secrets to Germany and was initially  convicted before famously being sent to the maximum security prison on  ‘Devil’s Island’. He was then – following much lobbying and bribery from  the jewish community and socialists in France – re-tried and found  innocent.

Indeed, when ‘L’Auto-Vélo’s’ cycling journalist, Géo Lefèvre, came up  with the Tour de France in an editorial meeting on 20th November 1902, it was to revive the paper's fortunes as an instrument to fight back  against the jewish domination of France – as exemplified by the Dreyfus  Affair itself – and it was wildly successful with the ardently  anti-Semitic and Nationalist ‘L’Auto-Vélo’ putting the philo-Semitic and  liberal-leftist ‘Le Vélo’ out of business the year after the advent of  the Tour de France in 1904. (1)

This kind of blue-sky thinking and daring is actually what  Nationalism needs today. We need new concepts, methods and means to  reach out and inspire our people in the fight against international  jewry and its gentile myrmidons.

We will either do this or we will fade out of world history with nothing but barely a whimper.

References

  1. For more information see: Jacques Goddet, 1991, ‘L’équipée belle’, 1st Edition, Éditions Robert Laffont: Paris